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Archive for January, 2016

HISTORY 4953-AMERICAN STUDIES 4823

AMERICAN ICONS

 

CLASS: TU & TH 10:00-11:15                                                             MH     4.02.40

PROFESSOR CATHERINE CLINTON                                     OFFICE: MH 4.03.46

catherine.clinton@mac.com                              OFFICE HOURS: 2-4 P.M. TUESDAY

 

The History Department Office is located in MH 4.04.06/4.04.07 and is open Monday – Friday from 8:00am – 5:00pm.  Andrea Trease, Senior Administrative Associate, and Dr. Gregg Michel, Chair, are available at (210) 458-4033 or history@utsa.edu and will be happy to tell you more about the programs and to answer your questions.  See our Department Website at the following URL address: http://colfa.utsa.edu/history/.

Students are expected to follow citation and references for your final research essay, as specified in the Chicago Manual of Style. http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

 

Careful and exact adherence can prevent plagiarism—which will not be tolerated.

If you are uncertain about a citation or reference, please consult the Instructor.

 

Any work submitted which is plagiarized will result in an F for the assignment, and may result in failing the course.

 

The UTSA common syllabus LINK is available for your convenience:

http://utsa.edu/syllabus

With valuable information on Counseling Service, Disabilities, Medical Issues, Supplemental Instruction, Tutoring Service

Supplemental Instruction:  Supplemental Instruction offers student-led study groups using collaborative learning for historically difficult classes. Supported courses and schedules can be found on the TRC website. You can call the SI office if you have questions or for more information at (210) 458-7251.

Tutoring Services: Tomás Rivera Center (TRC) may assist in building study skills and tutoring in course content. The TRC has several locations at the Main Campus and is also located at the Downtown Campus. For more information, visit the Tutoring Services web page or call (210) 458-4694 on the Main Campus and (210) 458-2838 on the Downtown Campus.

 

IMPORTANT DATES:

*Mar. 21: Last day for both undergraduate and graduate students to drop an individual class via ASAP and receive an Automatic “W”

*Apr. 27: Last for all students to drop all classes and receive an Automatic “W” for each course

 

Course Description:

AMERICAN ICONS will examine major events within the past one hundred years shaping what scholars in recent years have come to call “the American Century” and how certain images/institutions/symbols/ persons have become icons, representing values, ideas, a set of both which have come to represent certain aspects of America.

The way in which particular icons have come to represent an ideological as well as practical representation of US culture may be explored. The iconography of American culture & biography as well as ideology will frame the historical analysis for this course, and focus on appreciation of cultural imperialism and assimilation within contemporary society.

This module is being linked with classrooms abroad through a template developed at Temple University in Philadelphia. We will be COMMUNICATING via a blog with students from other network universities: the University of Angers, France. All students are expected to participate in an online site and to maintain weekly updating.

Questions to think about:

What is an icon?

How does something or someone become an icon?

What power does an icon have?

How do icons circulate?

How does the meaning of an icon change over time?

 

Course Requirements:

 

You will need to keep up with the readings, share your insights with the class (again in the classroom and on-line), and complete a variety of different kinds of assignments meant to get you to think about and understand the basics ideas associated with American culture.

 

ERIC FONER THE STORY OF AMERICAN FREEDOM
F. SCOTT FITZGERALD THE GREAT GATSBY
JOY CASSON Buffalo Bill’s Wild West: Celebrity, Memory and Popular History
MARK KINGWELL NEAREST THING TO HEAVEN:

EMPIRE STATE BUILDING & AMERICAN DREAMS

MARY CROSS A CENTURY OFAMERICAN ICONS
BRYANT SIMON BOARDWALK OF DREAMS
KAREN COX DREAMING OF DIXIE

 

 

ERIC FONER’S STORY OF AMERICAN FREEDOM.

(should provide a foundation for your understanding of the topics we discuss—)

in addition, Mary Cross’s work should provide stimulating visual material.

 

READINGS ARE DIVIDED INTO REQUIRED AND OPTIONAL—

 

PLEASE COMPLETE REQUIRED READING IN ADVANCE OF TUESDAYS (Unless specified for a Thursday discussion)

 

AND COME TO TUESDAY CLASS PREPARED FOR DISCUSSION OF WEEKLY READINGS.

 

Other useful Readings are available on the AMERICAN ICONS PAGE

https://americaniconstemeple.wordpress.com/about-american-icons/

 

–for example, downloadable articles are located on the right hand column—bottom right:

 

AMERICAN ICONS BLOG:

https://americaniconstemeple.wordpress.com/

Professor Bryant Simon, Temple University will add you to the module blog and

you will be in dialogue with students from across the globe (Past and present)

 

brysimon@temple.edu

IF YOU HAVE ANY PROBLEMS, CONTACT ME FIRST—

PROFESSOR SIMON IS OUR LAST STOP ON THE TROUBLE TRAIN….

 

ASSESSMENT:

MARKING:

Students will attend and contribute to Tuesday tutorial discussion: 10%

Students will write four contributions to online discussion board for assessment: 40%

Students will prepare a TEN MINUTE oral presentation on an individually selected ICON: 10%

Students will prepare a joint posting on an icon with a partner: 10%

Students will prepare a 2,500-3,000-word research essay: 30%

 

 

10% ATTENDANCE AND CLASS PARTICIPATION

 

You will also need to communicate and participate on the CLASS DISCUSSION BOARD FOR THE MODULE, AS WELL AS THE website – AmericanIconsTemple on wordpress — https://americaniconstemeple.wordpress.com/

 

Participation will be graded on a basis according to the following formula–the quality and thoughtfulness of the questions you ask, and how you help move the discussion and help others see things in new and different ways:

 

A                Present, Fully Prepared, Contributing,

B+              Present and Prepared and Contributing

C               Present and not contributing

D                Present and not contributing at all (disinterested)

F                Repeated Absence or Lack of contribution

 

PLEASE DO REQUIRED READING IN CORE TEXT AND INCORPORATE SOME OF THE OPTIONAL READINGS INTO YOUR FINAL PROJECTS—this will be evaluated as an important exercise. STUDENTS MAY FIND IT USEFUL TO CONSULT THE ARCHIVES OF THE TEMPLE AMERICAN ICON BLOG for additional insights and guidance to sources.

 

IN ADDITION, A VALUABLE ONLINE RESOURCE IS FOUND AT

A RADIO SERIES DEDICATED TO AMERICAN ICONS at

Kurt Andersen’s Studio 360

http://www.studio360.org/series/american-icons/

 

Again,

TUTORIAL 10%

 

ONLINE POSTINGS 40%

FINAL UPLOAD OF COMBINED ASSIGNMENTS:

DUE BY THURSDAY, APRIL 28TH, NOON.

 

ALL STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO POST ASSIGNMENTS BY FIVE P.M. ON MONDAY

THE DAY BEFORE TUESDAYS CLASS MEETING:

THESE POSTINGS MUST BE PUT ON THE DISCUSSION BOARD FOR THE COURSE—THEY MUST BE CUT AND PASTED ONTO BOARD—not uploaded as a document.

 

AT LEAST ONE FINAL SHARED POSTING MUST BE PUT UP ON THE TEMPLE ICONS BLOG PAGE—THE LAST WEEK OF THE COURSE.

KEEP A COPY OF A WORD DOCUMENT FOR EACH ASSIGNMENT—AT THE END OF THE SEMESTER, YOU CAN SELECT THREE OF YOUR ASSIGNMENTS TO COMBINE INTO A SINGLE DOCUMENT TO UPLOAD FOR A FINAL MARKED ASSESSMENT.

 

DUE BY THURSDAY, APRIL 28TH, NOON.

 

ORAL ASSIGNMENT: 10%

FOR ORAL REPORTS, Weeks XIII & XIV: April 19 & 21, 26TH & 28th

 

STUDENTS WILL DELIVER A TEN MINUTE ORAL REPORT ON AN AMERICAN ICON OF THEIR CHOICE (INSTRUCTOR APPROVAL REQUIRED) DURING WEEK 13 or 14…YOU WILL BE ASSESSED ON FACTORS WHICH WILL INCLUDE: EYE CONTACT, CLARITY, VERBAL ABILITY, VISUAL OR OTHER AIDS, TOPIC CONTENT.

No student will be allowed to exceed the ten minutes allotted for his/her report.

 

BLOG POST WITH A PARTNER: 10%

DUE BY LAST WEEK OF CLASS: APRIL 28TH.

 

30% FINAL RESEARCH ESSAY:

DUE NOON WEDNESDAY, MAY 4.

2,500-3,000 words. Please keep to the word count AND FOLLOW:

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

 

WRITE AN ESSAY ON AMERICAN ICON OF YOUR CHOICE (INSTRUCTOR APPROVED TOPIC). A LIST OF SUITABLE ICONS ARE LISTED AT THE END OF THE SYLLABUS.

 

YOU WILL BE ASKED TO PROPOSE YOUR FINAL RESEARCH TOPIC FOR YOUR ORAL REPORT/WEBSITE PAGE— PREPARE A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF 5-10 RESOURCES.SUBMIT ON DISCUSSION BOARD. ALL TOPICS SUBJECT TO APPROVAL. SUBMIT TOPICS BY MONDAY, MARCH 20TH AT 5:00 P.M.

WEEKLY READINGS SHOULD BE PREPARED FOR TUESDAY’S CLASS.

 

Week ONE

Introduction TO AMERICAN ICONS

JAN 11 (Intro)

&

JAN 13

VIEW:

Pete Seeger

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YiEAcZhqojk

Neil Diamond

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3S7mlRYL-8

WE DIDN’T START THE FIRE

http://www.lyrics007.com/Billy%20Joel%20Lyrics/We%20Didn%27t%20Start%20The%20Fire%20Lyrics.html

 

WEEK TWO

AMERICA AS AN ICON:

WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT: Find an Icon which you think represents America…Post it with a short (50 word description) (NOT FOR ASSESSMENT)

 

JAN 18 UNCLE SAM

&

JAN 20 STATUE OF LIBERTY

 

REQUIRED Reading & VIEWING

Kuklick on Myths and Symbols

 

Optional readings:

http://jah.oxfordjournals.org.queens.ezp1.qub.ac.uk/content/94/4/1186.full

“Famous Americans”: The Changing Pantheon of American Heroes

Sam Wineburg and Chauncey Monte-Sano

Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org.queens.ezp1.qub.ac.uk/stable/25095326

Kemp on Icons (Temple American Icons blog—right column)

 

Week THREE

THEMES: PROGRESS & HERITAGE

 

JANUARY 26  

&

JANUARY 28

 

BACKGROUND READING: Eric Foner, Story of American Freedom,

   Chapter Seven “Progressive Freedom” & Chapter Eight, “The Birth of Civil Liberties”

 

ASSIGNMENT II:

BLOG POST (250-500 WORDS)

DISCUSS HOW DOES A BUILDING BECOME AN ICON—WHAT TURNS IT FROM JUST A STRUCTURE OR PLACE INTO A SYMBOL.

 

REQUIRED READING:

KINGWELL’S NEAREST THING TO HEAVEN

 

OPTIONAL READINGS:

http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/historyonline/hollywood_great_depression.cfm

 

Week FOUR

THE WEST

 

FEBRUARY 2

&

(NO CLASS FEBRUARY 4TH)

 

Required Reading: JOY KASSON Buffalo Bill’s Wild West: Celebrity, Memory and Popular History

MARY CROSS, “INTRO, 1900-1930”

 

Week FIVE

AMERICAN CENTURY SYMBOLS

 

ASSIGNMENT III:

(BLOG POST: 250-500 WORDS)

PICK AN ADVERTISEMENT FROM MARY CROSS 1900-1930.

COMMENT ON THE ICONIC ASPECTS OF YOUR CHOICE.

 

REQUIRED READING: FITZGERALD’S THE GREAT GATSBY

 

FEBRUARY 9: THE GREAT GATSBY

 

NEW YORK TIMES online archive

http://www.nytimes.com/learning/issues_in_depth/gatsby.html

 

Clinton, Catherine

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/features/culture/great-gatsby-mania/2004026.article

 

&

FEBRUARY 11: THE LINCOLN MEMORIAL

 

Readings for Lincoln’s Birthday (Feb. 12)

 

LINCOLN MEMORIAL & “American Freedom”

http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2046285_2045996_2046001.00.html

 

 

OPTIONAL READINGS:

Raymond Arsenault, The sound of Freedom: Marian Anderson, the Lincoln Memorial, and the concert that awakened America.

 

WEEK SIX

PATRIOTIC ICONS

 

ASSIGNMENT IV

(250-500 WORDS)

EXAMINE AND COMMENT ON ONE OF NORMAN ROCKWELL’S FOUR FREEDOMS ILLUSTRATIONS. PLEASE INTERWEAVE SOME OF THE MATERIAL YOU HAVE READ FROM FONER INTO YOUR RESPONSE.

http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/powers_of_persuasion/four_freedoms/four_freedoms.html

 

Background Reading:

Eric Foner, Story of American Freedom,

Chapter Nine “The New Deal and the Redefinition of Freedom”

Chapter Ten “FIGHTING FOR FREEDOM”

FEBRUARY 16

&

FEBRUARY 18

 

ADDITIONAL READINGS:

http://www.ihr.org/jhr/v07/v07p319_Dickson.html

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/Norman-Rockwells-Storytelling-Lessons.html?onsite_source=relatedarticles&onsite_medium=internallink&onsite_campaign=SmithMag&onsite_content=Norman%20Rockwell%E2%80%99s%20Storytelling%20Lessons

 

Norman Rockwell Museum
Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/Norman-Rockwells-Neighborhood.html#ixzz2JK4jf5p2

 

 

WEEK SEVEN

AMERICA IN THE WORLD

 

FEBRUARY 23

&

FEBRUARY 25

 

ASSIGNMENT V: (500-1000 words)

PLEASE EXPLAIN HOW either SUPERMAN OR ROSIE THE RIVETER–IMAGINARY ICONS, SYMBOLIC OF AMERICA–REFLECT ISSUES OF MASCULINITY OR FEMININITY IN MID-20TH CENTURY AMERICA.

 

Superman

2013 style: http://www.hasbro.com/gijoe/en_US/

http://muse.jhu.edu.queens.ezp1.qub.ac.uk/results#type=ajax&startYear=&stopYear=&limits=subscription:Y&terms=content:superman:AND&m=1

https://americaniconstemeple.wordpress.com/?attachment_id=2216

https://americaniconstemeple.wordpress.com/?attachment_id=2219

 

Rosie the Riveter

http://www.nps.gov/pwro/collection/website/rosie.htm

http://www.rosietheriveter.org/

 

REQUIRED READING:

JILL LEPORE

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/09/22/last-amazon

Jason Serafino

http://www.complex.com/pop-culture/2013/06/evolution-of-superman-in-pop-culture/

http://www.jstor.org/stable/43308456

Boehm, Carl. “Superman: The Myth Through the Christ and the Revelation”. Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts 11 (3 (43)). [Brian Attebery, as Editor, for the International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts, International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts]: 2000: 236–44.

 

ADDITIONAL READING:

Elaine Tyler May, Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era (New York: Basic Books, 1990)

Jill Lepore, The Secret History of Wonder Woman (New York: Knopf, 2014)

 

 

WEEK EIGHT

MUSIC AND ICONOGRAPHY

 

Background Reading:

FONER, Chapter Eleven “COLD WAR FREEDOM”

MARCH 1

&

MARCH 3

 

ASSIGNMENT VI

CAN A SONG BE AN AMERICAN ICON?

NOMINATE A SONG AND DISCUSS HOW AND WHY IT BEST REPRESENTS AMERICA. (500 WORDS)

 

Listening:

Gillian Welch, “Elvis Presley Blues,” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JstFQt8k4_Q

 

PETER GURALNICK, ELVIS PRESLEY (PDF)

                   TEMPLE AMERICAN ICONS—DOWNLOAD.

 

“Elvis Presley and Racism,” http://www.elvis.com.au/presley/elvis_not_racist.shtml

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/cifamerica/2010/sep/18/strange-fruit-song-today

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Web007rzSOI

 

OPTIONAL READING:

Peter Guralnick, Last Train to Memphis

David Margolick, Strange Fruit: The Biography of a Song

and

http://www.jstor.org.queens.ezp1.qub.ac.uk/stable/20641394

Rock and Revolution: An Interview with El Vez, the Mexican Elvis

Susan Larson and Robert López

Arizona Journal of Hispanic Cultural Studies, Vol. 1, (1997), pp. 141-152

Published by: Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Arizona

 

WEEK NINE

THE AMERICAN DREAM

Background Reading:

Mary Cross: 1940s/50s/60s & Foner, Story of American Freedom, 12: SIXTIES FREEDOM

ASSIGNMENT VII: FIND AN IMAGE FOR AN

ABSTRACT CONCEPT TO POST ON THE CLASS DISCUSSION BOARD.

NOMINATE YOUR OWN AMERICAN ICON &

PROVIDE SOME BACKGROUND AND

WHY YOU SELECTED IT. (500 WORDS MAXIMUM)

 

Required Reading: Bryant Simon, Boardwalk Dreams

Barbie:

Required reading and viewing:

TEMPLE ICONS wordpress blog:

 

MARCH 8

&

MARCH 10

 

YOU WILL BE ASKED TO PROPOSE YOUR FINAL RESEARCH TOPIC FOR YOUR ORAL REPORT/WEBSITE PAGE— PREPARE A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF 5-10 RESOURCES.SUBMIT ON DISCUSSION BOARD. ALL TOPICS SUBJECT TO APPROVAL.

 

SPRING BREAK: Finish Reading Cross, 1970s/80s/90s

 

SUBMIT TOPICS BY email to Professor Clinton MONDAY, MARCH 21st AT 5:00 P.M.

WEEK TEN

MARCH 22 & MARCH 24

 

MUHAMMED ALI & ROSA PARKS

 

REQUIRED READINGS:

“Today in History, December 1: Rosa Parks Arrested.”

Library of Congress. < http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/today/dec01.html >. 15 Jan. 2013.

http://www.jstor.org/stable/20838459.

Hafiz, Amina. 2005. “Rosa Parks: Mother of the Civil Rights Movement: 1913 – 2005”. Off Our Backs 35 (9/10). off our backs, inc.: 10–10.

The Rosa Parks Story: The Making of a Civil Rights Icon

Delphine Letort

Black Camera, Vol. 3, No. 2 (Spring 2012), pp. 31-50

Published by: Indiana University Press

Article DOI: 10.2979/blackcamera.3.2.31

Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org.queens.ezp1.qub.ac.uk/stable/10.2979/blackcamera.3.2.31

 

http://www.npr.org/2013/02/04/171079150/remembering-rosa-parks-on-her-100th-birthday

 

MUHAMMED ALI: THE GREATEST,

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/people/muhammad_ali

http://www.alex-haley.com/muhammad_ali_ringside.htm

http://life.time.com/culture/muhammad-ali-joe-frazier-photos-fight-of-the-century/#1

OPTIONAL READINGS:

WELCOME BACK TO IRELAND: MUHAMMED O’ALI

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1210524/Muhammad-Ali-freeman-ancestral-home-Ireland.html

DOUGLAS BRINKLEY, ROSA PARKS

 

DISCUSSION OF ORAL REPORTS AND RESEARCH ESSAY TOPICS THIS WEEK.

 

 

WEEK ELEVEN:

MARCH 29

&

APRIL 1

 

THE SOUTH

Required Reading: KAREN COX, Dreaming of Dixie

Optional Reading:

Anthony Harkins, Hillbilly: A Cultural History of an American Icon (2004)

Chris Williams, Rednecks & Bluenecks: The Politics of Country Music (2007)

 

WEEK TWELVE:

APRIL 5TH—NO CLASS

APRIL 7TH–SKYPE MEETINGS WITH PROFESSOR CLINTON:

(WORK ON YOUR GROUP ICON, WORK ON YOUR INDIVIDUAL PRESENTATIONS AND FINAL RESEARCH TOPIC)

 

 

 

 

WEEK THIRTEEN

PRESENTATIONS: 4-5 PER CLASS

APRIL 12

&

APRIL 14

 

WEEK FOURTEEN

PRESENTATONS: 3-4 PER CLASS

APRIL 26

&

APRIL 28

 

30% RESEARCH ESSAY: DUE NOON WEDNESDAY, MAY 4

2,500-3,000 words. Please keep to the word count AND FOLLOW:

http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html

 

WRITE A FINAL RESEARCH ESSAY ON AN AMERICAN ICON OF YOUR CHOICE FROM THE LIST OF APPROVED TOPICS –OR CONSULT WITH PROFESSOR CLINTON.

 

Approved topics:

 

THE ALAMO

MARTIN LUTHER KING

THE HOLLYWOOD SIGN

WIZARD OF OZ (FILM)

THE FLAPPER

COLONEL SANDERS

MISS AMERICA

HARVEY MILK

GI JOE

DISNEYLAND

BABE RUTH

GONE WITH THE WIND (BOOK OR FILM)

MOUNT RUSHMORE

MCDONALD’S GOLDEN ARCHES

THE PENTAGON

JACKIE ROBINSON

THE PINUP GIRL

ROUTE 66

JOHNNY APPLESEED

THE PENTAGON

LAS VEGAS

SHIRLEY TEMPLE

THE LIBERTY BELL

THE HOBO

MALCOLM X

CESAR CHAVEZ

GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE

WOODY GURTHRIE’S “THIS LAND IS YOUR LAND”

 

 

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